Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Life As We Knew It

book cover image from goodreads.com

Pfeffer, Susan Beth.  Life As We Knew It.  337p.  Harcourt.  2006.  ISBN  978-0-15-205826-5.

Imagine if life as we knew it was a distant memory.  This happens to Miranda, her family, and the rest of the world in Life As We Knew It.

Miranda and her family, along with most everyone else in her small Pennsylvania town, plan on watching the meteor hitting the moon from the comforts of their yards.  There is definitely an uneasy feeling in the air, but no one can imagine the havoc that the meteor will wreak.  The moon gets knocked out of orbit, and “life as we knew it” ends.  What follows is a suspenseful, nail-biting, survival story.  All across the planet, millions of people die as there are tsunamis, earthquakes, and other life-ending natural disasters.

Miranda’s journal shows how her life changes in a blink of an eye.  One day she’s worrying about boys, swimming, and her best-friend who has changed, and the next she’s trying to literally survive by having enough food, warmth, and other everyday things that we take for granted until they are gone.

The author’s writing style can get a little self-serving at times as she has a pretty obvious political bias.  It doesn’t seem to fit in this novel, and is distracting.  It seems odd that a tween/teen author would write a book that is not about politics and then make one of the main characters so vocally abusive to half her audience.  I don’t think people are going to pick up this book expecting or wanting such blatant bashing of any political person or institution.

Despite the authors bias, the book is a very suspenseful and is well worth reading.

Genre:  Science fiction, apocalyptic,

Tags: dystopian, moon, natural disasters, diary, family life, teens, survival

Series:  This is the first book in the “Last Survivors” series.

A/R Reading level: 4.7

Interest level:  Grades 6-9

Link to Harvest Park Library catalog:  Life As We Knew It

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